Archives for posts with tag: Trufflepig Search Limited Hong Kong

The accessibility of media shared on platforms like Twitter, Facebook, and Youtube has permanently changed marketing. Michael Stelzner’s report surveyed over 3300 marketers to provide a snapshot of what marketers are up to in business for 2011. 

Here is the complete ‘2011 Social Media Marketing Industry Report.

A few take-aways:

  • The top question marketers wanted answered was on measurement tools to track ROI
  • 93% of those surveyed used some form of social media in their marketing efforts
  • 90% said it was important to their business (key insight: smaller businesses were more likely to agree)
  • A significant 58% of marketers are using social media for 6 hours or more each week and 34% for 11 or more hours weekly
  • 72% of marketers who have been using social media for more than 3 years report it had helped them close business
  • At least 73% of marketers plan on increasing their use of YouTube/video, blogs, Facebook and Twitter
  • 92% of marketers are using Facebook and 75% plan on increasing their activities
  • Blogs remain a strong area of focus for social media marketers, with 75% indicating they’ll increase their blogging activities
  • 73% of marketers will increase their activities on Twitter. Large businesses are most likely to increase their activities on Twitter, with 77% reporting

Trufflepig Search says that social media is essential for business. Targeted exposure, engaging with customers, and upping search engine rankings are just a few of the critical benefits—adding to what social media does for HR, recruiting, customer service, and PR.

by Sai Pradhan, Managing Director, Trufflepig Search Limited, Hong Kong

Trufflepig Search Limited is part of a group of engaged social media practitioners in Hong Kong called HK Social. This month, Jay Oatway, “the most followed man on Twitter in Hong Kong” hosted HK Social’s monthly gathering, and shared his thoughts on the future of social networking using Color, a new photo sharing app, as an example.

Color is fascinating. It capitalizes on the urge we all have to see everything that’s around us, not just from our own angle, but from the other side of the room, providing a visual map of our surroundings.

Here’s how it works:

You post a photo or video publicly when you’re logged in, and your content is streamed to everyone else within 100 feet of your location. You don’t choose your network; this app does it for you. As a result, what you have is a series of images from various perspectives, all of the same location you are in yourself.

Click here to see a demo.

Jay uses the example of the International World Rugby Sevens, a tremendously popular annual event in Hong Kong which took place last month. While quite a few of us in the stands shared photos and comments via Twitter at this notoriously vibrant sporting event, how much more visual information might we have had if several people were using the Color app?

“It’s hard to pinpoint the best use case for this app because it is so unique in design. You can use it to share photos among a group without having to pass the phone around, or you can use it to keep a visual log of not only your life, but of the lives of those you see the most,” writes Ben Parr for Mashable.

It remains to be seen how well this app does in comparison to the slew of new photo and video sharing apps on the market, but we’re looking forward to discovering its many uses.

From Sai Pradhan, Managing Director of Trufflepig Search Limited Hong Kong:

Ripa Rashid, Executive Vice President of the Center of Work-Life Policy was in Hong Kong last week, speaking at a luncheon organized by Asia Society.

I was pleased to see a presentation dedicated to talent retention in China and India and women in the workplace within Asia Society’s March repertoire. Ripa Rashid of the Center of Work-Life Policy recently co-authored an article for Harvard Business Review, ‘The Battle for Female Power in China and India,’ in context of multinational corporations looking to China and India for growth, and within those geographies, female talent, as an important factor. At Asia Society’s luncheon at the Foreign Correspondents Club, Ripa shared some of her key themes and findings from her research. Here are the highlights:

  • The percentage of women at tertiary education levels has increased 10% in the last decade in India and 23% in China. This is evidence of the increasingly highly qualified female talent pool in both countries.
  • 85% of women in India and 83% of women in China are eager to be promoted to the next level, compared to 52% in the U.S. With ambition levels at such a high, women seem poised for professional advancement.
  • Women are reported to show high levels of loyalty to their employers in both countries: 92% in India and 88% in China. I wondered if this meant their pay scales didn’t jump as much as they might. I asked Ripa after the luncheon, and she said that generally speaking, women had different consideration factors than their male counterparts in finding and staying with favourable employers. Factors such as the quality of their teams, their comfort level with company policies, and the fact that the longer they stayed with their employers, the more likely they were to avail of flexible schedules, outweighed the desire for salary bumps.
  • In contextualizing the female talent pool in China and India, Ripa described the various ‘pulls’ on women in these countries. 35% of Chinese women and 52% of Indian women face pressure to drop out after they have their first child. ‘Daughterly guilt’ weighs 88% of women down in China and 70% of women in India, while maternal guilt affects 86% and 62% respectively.
  • She then went on to describe some of the ‘push’ factors. Jobs are becoming more extreme, with longer hours for women in China and India. On average, Ripa shared, they are working between 10-18 additional hours per week compared to their workload three years ago. An astounding statistic indeed.  Prejudice in the workplace affects 55% of women in India (enough for them to consider quitting or pulling back from their jobs) and 48% of women in China. Safety, and practical and cultural barriers to international mobility (considered an important part of professional advancement), are other factors that ‘push’ women in these countries.
  • China’s one-child policy means that it will soon be faced with a graying population, whereas in India, the demographics weigh favourably toward the young but are faced with infrastructural challenges in the country.

Ripa shared a few models that some companies have employed to attract and sustain the best female talent, and help women deal with the various pulls and pushes of the work environment, such as Google India’s Women’s Engineering Award, Intel’s Women at Intel in China, and Cisco’s Extended Flex Program.

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