Archives for posts with tag: social networking

In today’s super-connected world, brands must remain tech-savvy to stay relevant and prove their value to customers who are online more than ever.  A recent Bloomberg article reports how the automotive industry has adapted to the needs of its customers on the web.

In the article, Johan de Nysschen, Audi’s U.S. chief, says that people are accustomed to the benefits of connectivity intheir everyday lives, so car companies shouldn’t expect drivers to be isolated from what’s happening around the world when they get into their vehicles.

Here’s how a few car companies are keeping up with customer needs, according to Chris Reiter and Tim Higgins at Bloomberg:

Toyota: just announced last week that they will begin work on Toyota Friend, a social network for Toyota owners, details to be announced soon.

BMW: allows users to lock their cars and turn on the heat remotely via a smartphone app.

Ford: lets users play music on voice command and have their tweets read out loud.

Audi: will add real-time traffic data to its navigation service in Europe later this year.

Mercedes: provides Internet access (full while stationary, restricted when driving!) in select models.

Read more here.

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The volume and constant flow of today’s online information can make it difficult to stand out in the sea of resumes and profiles, often making it difficult for recruiters to pinpoint the right candidates. The applicants who possess qualities suited for the company may not put as much time into polishing their personal profiles as they do their resumes and cover letters.

Trufflepig Search sees social networking sites as a hub of opportunities for people to not only stay connected, but also a place for prospects to market themselves as potential employees. The search power that comes with being part of a social network—because it is social—creates more chances for recruiters to recognize a candidate with a history of engagement in industries relevant to the hiring company. Sites like LinkedIn, in particular, are especially useful for showcasing accumulated experience in the workforce because of its professional focus on networking.

In her article, “Everybody’s Business,” Margaret Milkint of Best’s Review advises jobseekers to become proactive in the virtual world so that employers can spot a prospective candidate: “Merely joining a social network is equivalent to hiding in the corner at a networking event. With your original goal in mind, participate! Search for and link to, friends or follow people who can add value. Join relevant groups; monitor or post jobs; and share interesting links and insightful remarks. … demonstrate a willingness to act … by participating in the conversation.”

LinkedIn even provides its users with a profile-building checklist to maximize their exposure to recruiters. Use it!

Social media presents new options for recruiters to find candidate background but the traditional methods of researching potential employees are still essential. According to HR Magazine, many corporate attorneys limit what its employees can say about past employees, even employees who could benefit from compliments on good work ethic (Meinert, 2011).

The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) poll on background checks taken in 2010 revealed that most information provided by former employers gives limited help in deciding whether a candidate is a good company match. Of the 433 responding organizations, 98% said they would verify the dates of employment for current or former employees. More than two-thirds said they would not discuss work performance, and over 80% said they would neither discuss character and personality nor any disciplinary actions taken while the candidate was employed (Meinert, 2011). Because references are not always a reliable source of useful information, companies are turning to social networking sites to aid in background checks.

Of course, phone calls and profile research are still essential to the hiring process. Screening through social networking sites is much more cost-effective than traditional phone interviews. LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter all provide free services where companies can post career opportunities that gain exposure to consumers as well. However, Trufflepig Search understands that nothing can take the place of first hand interaction. Interviews offer a better chance to interpret the candidate’s tone and indicate certain personality traits.

It’s still time consuming but important to contact phone references. Yves Lermusi, CEO of Checkster, a background-screening company, states that, for a traditional reference check by phone, it takes 76 minutes to try to contact three references and reach two (Meinert, 2011).

Trufflepig Search uses social networking sites to find candidates who are Internet-savvy and know about LinkedIn, Twitter, or Facebook. Applicants who are familiar with these social networking sites are especially valuable.

Especially in tough economic times, we at Trufflepig Search know the value of incorporating social media into our recruiting efforts.

References

Meinert, D.. (2011, February). SEEING BEHIND THE MASK. HR Magazine, 56(2), 31-32,34,36-37.  Retrieved from ABI/INFORM Global. (Document ID: 2251277611).

Weinstein, M.. (2010, September). Are You LinkedIn? Training, 47(5), 30-33.  Retrieved from ABI/INFORM Global. (Document ID: 2250060131).

by Sai Pradhan, Managing Director, Trufflepig Search Limited, Hong Kong

Trufflepig Search Limited is part of a group of engaged social media practitioners in Hong Kong called HK Social. This month, Jay Oatway, “the most followed man on Twitter in Hong Kong” hosted HK Social’s monthly gathering, and shared his thoughts on the future of social networking using Color, a new photo sharing app, as an example.

Color is fascinating. It capitalizes on the urge we all have to see everything that’s around us, not just from our own angle, but from the other side of the room, providing a visual map of our surroundings.

Here’s how it works:

You post a photo or video publicly when you’re logged in, and your content is streamed to everyone else within 100 feet of your location. You don’t choose your network; this app does it for you. As a result, what you have is a series of images from various perspectives, all of the same location you are in yourself.

Click here to see a demo.

Jay uses the example of the International World Rugby Sevens, a tremendously popular annual event in Hong Kong which took place last month. While quite a few of us in the stands shared photos and comments via Twitter at this notoriously vibrant sporting event, how much more visual information might we have had if several people were using the Color app?

“It’s hard to pinpoint the best use case for this app because it is so unique in design. You can use it to share photos among a group without having to pass the phone around, or you can use it to keep a visual log of not only your life, but of the lives of those you see the most,” writes Ben Parr for Mashable.

It remains to be seen how well this app does in comparison to the slew of new photo and video sharing apps on the market, but we’re looking forward to discovering its many uses.

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