Archives for posts with tag: recruitment

The volume and constant flow of today’s online information can make it difficult to stand out in the sea of resumes and profiles, often making it difficult for recruiters to pinpoint the right candidates. The applicants who possess qualities suited for the company may not put as much time into polishing their personal profiles as they do their resumes and cover letters.

Trufflepig Search sees social networking sites as a hub of opportunities for people to not only stay connected, but also a place for prospects to market themselves as potential employees. The search power that comes with being part of a social network—because it is social—creates more chances for recruiters to recognize a candidate with a history of engagement in industries relevant to the hiring company. Sites like LinkedIn, in particular, are especially useful for showcasing accumulated experience in the workforce because of its professional focus on networking.

In her article, “Everybody’s Business,” Margaret Milkint of Best’s Review advises jobseekers to become proactive in the virtual world so that employers can spot a prospective candidate: “Merely joining a social network is equivalent to hiding in the corner at a networking event. With your original goal in mind, participate! Search for and link to, friends or follow people who can add value. Join relevant groups; monitor or post jobs; and share interesting links and insightful remarks. … demonstrate a willingness to act … by participating in the conversation.”

LinkedIn even provides its users with a profile-building checklist to maximize their exposure to recruiters. Use it!

Social networking gave more access to employers and employees alike, connecting people more easily and faster than ever. Social sites like LinkedIn can provide job seekers with any company’s listings instantly and give employers access to jobseekers quickly.  Although there are obvious negative effects of such transparency, the benefits of using social networking sites as a hiring tool outweigh its risks. Recruiters should continue utilizing the sites, they should also be careful in selecting the criteria they use to review candidates.

The American Journal of Business Education explains that the top three reasons employers reject candidates after online screenings are because they posted “provocative or inappropriate photos or information… content regarding use of drinking or drugs, and because they bad mouthed a previous employer, co-worker, or client” (Vicknair, 2010). Companies can use social networking sites before hiring to avoid candidates with poor work ethic, lack of professionalism, or who engage in illicit activities—details that no applicant would willingly disclose in an interview. Donald Kluemper of Louisiana State University and Peter Rosen of the University of Evansville in Indiana say personal pages on Facebook and similar social networking sites can be used to predict the personality of a job candidate, much like a personality test (HR Magazine, 2010).

Many people searching for jobs fear that recruiters might use social networking sites to invade their privacy or discriminate based on inappropriate criteria. While this is a valid concern, applicants always have the option of keeping their information private; it is the responsibility of the candidate to know the consequences of self-presentation and to employ censorship if necessary. Only if an employer somehow gains access to private information (only accessible to “friends” or a customizable list), would the candidate have a legal claim against the employer for invasion of privacy (Practical Lawyer, Martucci, 2010).

Employers must also be aware that visiting a candidate’s profile could result in finding information that would otherwise be off-limits for employers to inquire about. Basing hiring decisions on attributes such as disability, race, religion, and age could result in unlawful discrimination against the potential employee. To avoid liability, it is crucial that all searches and sites visited be well documented. That said, the value of engaging on social sites is still growing and candidates should keep an updated professional profile on LinkedIn, complete with recommendations, descriptions, keywords, and groups. This is fast becoming a valuable source for recruiters, including ours at Trufflepig Search.

References

 

Martucci, W., Oldvader, J., & Smith, J.. (2010, October). Hiring And Firing In The Facebook Age (With Sample Provisions). Practical Lawyer. Retrieved from Law Module. (Document ID: 2186179701).

Society for Human Resource Management. (2010, February). The other face of Facebook.

HR Magazine. Retrieved from:

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m3495/is_2_55/ai_n52359315/

Vicknair, J., Elkersh, D., Yancey, K., & Budden, M.. (2010). The use of social networking websites as a recruiting tool for employers. American Journal of Business Education, 3(11), 7-12.  Retrieved from ABI/INFORM Global. (Document ID: 2216409391).

 

Social media for business encompasses more than the average person’s Facebook status update or Tweet about the latest viral video. For companies, social media offers a range of opportunities to connect and engage with their target audience with more targeted ads, direct engagement with potential and current customers, and unique branding opportunities, just to name a few of the possibilities.

At Trufflepig Search, we know it takes much more than a registered company page on Facebook to maximize the potential of social media. How do you increase followers? Are you producing content of value to your customers and clients? How do you handle negative feedback or legal compliance in your industry?

To launch a successful social media campaign, there are critical factors: strategic goals, implementation, and fine-tuning of the tools to reach the target audience:

(1) Strategists plan campaigns and decide for using social media for the company. They determine the budget and feasibility of initial social media use, and decide how the company will choose to improve the campaign most practically and efficiently. Often strategists manage additional aspects, depending on the size of the company and its social media budget.

(2) Implementers and engagers (whose duties are often distributed among marketing, communications, sales, HR, and customer service) get the firm’s social media platforms up and running. This involves the design, content, and engagement that go into creating successful social media pages that communicate the company’s culture and goals. They also manage the personal representation of the organization and become most valuable once a social media interface is established. This role serves as the basis by which the company maintains good communication with its relevant clients, bloggers, or influencers. Implementers typically interact directly with customers so it is essential that they are well-trained in the company policies.

(3) Technologists who manage the marketing technology and tools are essential after the first implementation phase because social media is constantly changing and tools are constantly being created. Social media maximization demands constant re-evaluation to better suit customer needs, enhance the brand, and offer genuine value as a thought leader. Technologists are often developing apps, collecting metrics, and reviewing analytics to judge which tactics are effective and which need revamping.

Read an in-depth analysis of the different roles and skill sets that fall within these categories of social media professions on Quora. Our response is also shared in the discussion.

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