Archives for posts with tag: recruiting

Sai Pradhan, Managing Director, Trufflepig Search Hong Kong, was featured on the keynote panel at the Women Media Networks last month.  The two others who spoke at the panel were Jocelyn Liipfert, Head of Social Media at TBWA, and Jay Oatway, digital consultant and author of Mastering Story, Community and Influence: How to Use Social Media to Become a Social Leader.  Jocelyn, Jay, and Sai together stage the popular #HKSocial–a networking event focused on the power of digital and social media.

Sai explains how LinkedIn helps recruiters:

“In my experience as a headhunter for PR and communications positions, we do use LinkedIn, but very selectively. It’s a research tool, but we develop candidates more by personally reaching out to existing contacts and to sources in our networks and by developing specific research to find top talent for the position we are handling. So, yes, while professionals who are keeping an eye out for new opportunities should certainly create and use LinkedIn profiles, it cannot be the only way, nor should it consume all your job seeking time. But if you are on LinkedIn do make it easy for a recruiter to contact you.”
For more of Sai’s discussion on the WMN panel.

When Google+ was released a little over a year ago, it was marketed as a competitor to Facebook.  While Google+ has failed to reach the level of popularity and profitability of Facebook, it has not failed as a site.  The potential of Google+ is in its being an extension of Google, not in its attempt to be a social networking site.

Insiders view Google+ as a tool for supporting already-established internet tools, such as Google and Youtube.  This month Google+ introduced more features designed to integrate different Google tools into its interface. The Events feature on Google+ will be compatible with Google calendar and allows you to invite people who are outside your circles.  Google+ connects the different Google tools, such as mail, google search, and now the calendar, into one organized site.

From our view, people don’t engage with companies on Google+ as much as they do on Facebook, which makes it less successful as a marketing tool.  From the recruiting standpoint, the vast majority of users aren’t active enough on the site to make Google+ as worthwhile as LinkedIn, or even Facebook, for this purpose.

Google+ does beat Facebook at video-chatting.  The Google+ video-chatting feature allows users to form “hangouts” with many users on site.  Organizations, such as news organizations, can use such hangouts to live-stream interviews and take questions from a virtual and interactive audience.  

Finally, the mobile site for Google+ is more accessible.  As mobile is becoming an increasingly important market for social media, the Google+’ user-friendly mobile app gives it a possible advantage against Facebook.

For more

Jobsandtalent is an up and coming European-based recruiting site that incorporates social networking into the hiring process.  Felipe Navio Garcia and Juan Urdiales founded this startup on the hopes of using Facebook’s social network to change how companies search for employees.  Jobsandtalent works by getting information from a user’s Facebook profile information, such as education, work experience, and friends, but not any status updates or photos. Garcia and Urdiales both were separately developing a social recruiting site after realizing how social connections often help people find jobs through their friends.  Garcia and Urdiales had been connected to each other by mutual friends who realized they were both interested in developing similar businesses–that’s how they became partners.

One surprising aspect of Jobsandtalent is the use of Facebook, not LinkedIn as the source for their social recruitment site.  LinkedIn is a social media tool for professionals; it is designed for networking and hiring, whereas Facebook is a social media tool for friendships.  Garcia and Urdiales chose to connect their networking site to Facebook, because they believe one’s personal–not professional–connections most often lead to jobs.  Garcia explains that “The best 20 or 30 people you can ask for a recommendation are on Facebook, not LinkedIn”.  Jobsandtalent is the European alternative to BranchOut, another popular Facebook hiring site.  So far, Jobsandtalent has not widely been used outside of Europe.  On Jobsandtalent you have to add friends to your Jobsandtalent profile to get job suggestions, but on Branchout you do not.  While Branchout is also more user friendly and is the more established of the two, Jobsandtalent is gaining popularity in Europe.

For more on Jobsandtalent

Our very own Sai Pradhan, Managing Director of Trufflepig Search in Hong Kong was interviewed and featured in a story featuring Hong Kong’s ‘Digital Dreamers’–the digital and social media entrepreneurs making a deep impact in the Asia Pacific’s digital scene.

Sai is focused on recruitment of social media-savvy communications and marketing talent for client organizations.  Prior to her appointment to head the Hong Kong office, she was an Associate in the corporate communications and marketing speciality practice at Los Angeles-based Berkhemer Clayton, retained executive search consultants.  Previously with public relations agencies Ruder Finn and Fenton Communications, she has worked with a range of clients and industries, handling messaging, branding, positioning, corporate social responsibility, and media relations.

 Photo Credit: TimeOut.com.hk

A few highlights from Sai’s conversation with TimeOut Hong Kong:

How do you find your candidates?
If it’s a Hong Kong position, there are four or five names I can name off the top of my head, mainly because I’m so ingrained with the social media community here.

Describe the ideal candidate.
The ideal candidate in Asia is someone who can speak multiple languages, so if it’s a position in China it would be a bit silly to go with someone who only speaks English.The placements I’ve done have been 90 percent expat, but I don’t want to classify because it’s such a blurry line.


Is the salary which clients offer here on par with other cities in the world?
Of course, but you need to take into account that people don’t pay so much tax here, so base salaries are a little lower. In general, social media jobs tend to be a bit overpaid, that’s what I have been finding; just a little more than your average PR job.

Why is that?
I think perhaps people based in Asia feel less need to educate themselves on it than their counterparts elsewhere.

How educated do you need to be to succeed?
I’ve seen a lot of people just take it upon themselves to become the digital or socialmedia person within their company, but If you don’t understand whatever is applicable to your role, like brand messaging, then you’re going to be quite lost.


But isn’t it true that Hong Kong is far behind other world cities?

 


Complete Interview at TimeOut HK’s website

For more on Sai’s take on social media in China

The volume and constant flow of today’s online information can make it difficult to stand out in the sea of resumes and profiles, often making it difficult for recruiters to pinpoint the right candidates. The applicants who possess qualities suited for the company may not put as much time into polishing their personal profiles as they do their resumes and cover letters.

Trufflepig Search sees social networking sites as a hub of opportunities for people to not only stay connected, but also a place for prospects to market themselves as potential employees. The search power that comes with being part of a social network—because it is social—creates more chances for recruiters to recognize a candidate with a history of engagement in industries relevant to the hiring company. Sites like LinkedIn, in particular, are especially useful for showcasing accumulated experience in the workforce because of its professional focus on networking.

In her article, “Everybody’s Business,” Margaret Milkint of Best’s Review advises jobseekers to become proactive in the virtual world so that employers can spot a prospective candidate: “Merely joining a social network is equivalent to hiding in the corner at a networking event. With your original goal in mind, participate! Search for and link to, friends or follow people who can add value. Join relevant groups; monitor or post jobs; and share interesting links and insightful remarks. … demonstrate a willingness to act … by participating in the conversation.”

LinkedIn even provides its users with a profile-building checklist to maximize their exposure to recruiters. Use it!

Social networking gave more access to employers and employees alike, connecting people more easily and faster than ever. Social sites like LinkedIn can provide job seekers with any company’s listings instantly and give employers access to jobseekers quickly.  Although there are obvious negative effects of such transparency, the benefits of using social networking sites as a hiring tool outweigh its risks. Recruiters should continue utilizing the sites, they should also be careful in selecting the criteria they use to review candidates.

The American Journal of Business Education explains that the top three reasons employers reject candidates after online screenings are because they posted “provocative or inappropriate photos or information… content regarding use of drinking or drugs, and because they bad mouthed a previous employer, co-worker, or client” (Vicknair, 2010). Companies can use social networking sites before hiring to avoid candidates with poor work ethic, lack of professionalism, or who engage in illicit activities—details that no applicant would willingly disclose in an interview. Donald Kluemper of Louisiana State University and Peter Rosen of the University of Evansville in Indiana say personal pages on Facebook and similar social networking sites can be used to predict the personality of a job candidate, much like a personality test (HR Magazine, 2010).

Many people searching for jobs fear that recruiters might use social networking sites to invade their privacy or discriminate based on inappropriate criteria. While this is a valid concern, applicants always have the option of keeping their information private; it is the responsibility of the candidate to know the consequences of self-presentation and to employ censorship if necessary. Only if an employer somehow gains access to private information (only accessible to “friends” or a customizable list), would the candidate have a legal claim against the employer for invasion of privacy (Practical Lawyer, Martucci, 2010).

Employers must also be aware that visiting a candidate’s profile could result in finding information that would otherwise be off-limits for employers to inquire about. Basing hiring decisions on attributes such as disability, race, religion, and age could result in unlawful discrimination against the potential employee. To avoid liability, it is crucial that all searches and sites visited be well documented. That said, the value of engaging on social sites is still growing and candidates should keep an updated professional profile on LinkedIn, complete with recommendations, descriptions, keywords, and groups. This is fast becoming a valuable source for recruiters, including ours at Trufflepig Search.

References

 

Martucci, W., Oldvader, J., & Smith, J.. (2010, October). Hiring And Firing In The Facebook Age (With Sample Provisions). Practical Lawyer. Retrieved from Law Module. (Document ID: 2186179701).

Society for Human Resource Management. (2010, February). The other face of Facebook.

HR Magazine. Retrieved from:

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m3495/is_2_55/ai_n52359315/

Vicknair, J., Elkersh, D., Yancey, K., & Budden, M.. (2010). The use of social networking websites as a recruiting tool for employers. American Journal of Business Education, 3(11), 7-12.  Retrieved from ABI/INFORM Global. (Document ID: 2216409391).

 

Social media presents new options for recruiters to find candidate background but the traditional methods of researching potential employees are still essential. According to HR Magazine, many corporate attorneys limit what its employees can say about past employees, even employees who could benefit from compliments on good work ethic (Meinert, 2011).

The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) poll on background checks taken in 2010 revealed that most information provided by former employers gives limited help in deciding whether a candidate is a good company match. Of the 433 responding organizations, 98% said they would verify the dates of employment for current or former employees. More than two-thirds said they would not discuss work performance, and over 80% said they would neither discuss character and personality nor any disciplinary actions taken while the candidate was employed (Meinert, 2011). Because references are not always a reliable source of useful information, companies are turning to social networking sites to aid in background checks.

Of course, phone calls and profile research are still essential to the hiring process. Screening through social networking sites is much more cost-effective than traditional phone interviews. LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter all provide free services where companies can post career opportunities that gain exposure to consumers as well. However, Trufflepig Search understands that nothing can take the place of first hand interaction. Interviews offer a better chance to interpret the candidate’s tone and indicate certain personality traits.

It’s still time consuming but important to contact phone references. Yves Lermusi, CEO of Checkster, a background-screening company, states that, for a traditional reference check by phone, it takes 76 minutes to try to contact three references and reach two (Meinert, 2011).

Trufflepig Search uses social networking sites to find candidates who are Internet-savvy and know about LinkedIn, Twitter, or Facebook. Applicants who are familiar with these social networking sites are especially valuable.

Especially in tough economic times, we at Trufflepig Search know the value of incorporating social media into our recruiting efforts.

References

Meinert, D.. (2011, February). SEEING BEHIND THE MASK. HR Magazine, 56(2), 31-32,34,36-37.  Retrieved from ABI/INFORM Global. (Document ID: 2251277611).

Weinstein, M.. (2010, September). Are You LinkedIn? Training, 47(5), 30-33.  Retrieved from ABI/INFORM Global. (Document ID: 2250060131).

There has never been a more exciting time to be in public relations, advertising and marketing, thanks to the revolutionizing momentum of social media, online communications and creativity.  The sheer adventure of being at the beginning of a new frontier, a global transformation, a whole new way of looking at communication, it’s exhilarating.

Also it’s confusing, and corporations are wondering—who’s who and where’s where in this new world.  Who really knows what they are doing?  And are most corporate communications departments fumbling as they learn?  Can anyone afford to make mistakes as they learn?

On this threshold comes a new company, called Trufflepig Search, to recruit experienced communications and marketing professionals who are fluent in social media and savvy about how to harness the beast to drive the brand.   Trufflepig Search—we dig deep to unearth the best in social media.  Like the prized animal that can sense where the most delicious mushrooms grow and dig them up unharmed for consumption by people who appreciate the best, we at Trufflepig Search know how to find the best communicators and separate them from the rest.  We bring them to client corporations for consumption as full-time leaders and coaches—the key to corporate social media strategy that works.

With offices in Los Angeles and Hong Kong, Trufflepig Search will launch in January 2011, to serve the hungry consumer brand companies who desperately need strategic communicators who can navigate and capture social media for their brands.   Launched as a separate division of respected executive search firm Berkhemer Clayton, Trufflepig Search will capture the category.  Our goal is that inside three months, corporate communications executives will think Trufflepig when they need one or a team of social media pro’s.

The team-members we place will transform your company for the digital age.

“We dig deep to recruit the best in social media,” let us know what you think of this tagline on our Facebook page, Twitter, or join our LinkedIn group; comments, follows, and likes welcome. And look forward to our website launch in January 2011!

 

 

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