Archives for posts with tag: LinkedIn groups

The volume and constant flow of today’s online information can make it difficult to stand out in the sea of resumes and profiles, often making it difficult for recruiters to pinpoint the right candidates. The applicants who possess qualities suited for the company may not put as much time into polishing their personal profiles as they do their resumes and cover letters.

Trufflepig Search sees social networking sites as a hub of opportunities for people to not only stay connected, but also a place for prospects to market themselves as potential employees. The search power that comes with being part of a social network—because it is social—creates more chances for recruiters to recognize a candidate with a history of engagement in industries relevant to the hiring company. Sites like LinkedIn, in particular, are especially useful for showcasing accumulated experience in the workforce because of its professional focus on networking.

In her article, “Everybody’s Business,” Margaret Milkint of Best’s Review advises jobseekers to become proactive in the virtual world so that employers can spot a prospective candidate: “Merely joining a social network is equivalent to hiding in the corner at a networking event. With your original goal in mind, participate! Search for and link to, friends or follow people who can add value. Join relevant groups; monitor or post jobs; and share interesting links and insightful remarks. … demonstrate a willingness to act … by participating in the conversation.”

LinkedIn even provides its users with a profile-building checklist to maximize their exposure to recruiters. Use it!

The most popular discussion on LinkedIn’s “Intelligent Social Media” Group asks a pressing question about social media ownership within companies: Who should own the social media responsibility in corporations? Obviously, this is a loaded question with multi-faceted answers but the best discussions on LinkedIn generally are. Jay Baer, founder of Convince and Convert, and Amber Naslund break down this frequently complicated issue in terms of football. Even if you’re not a sports fan, the analogy is easy to understand and implement for any sized organization.

The coaching staff can be large or small but should represent many different departments including Marketing, PR, Communications, Investor Relations, HR, Customer Service, and IT—just to name a few. The players are the listeners and implementers, they are the ones making it happen on the ground level and interacting with customer conversations directly. They should be well-trained and well-versed in the tools and procedures and managed accordingly. The participants that develop the strategies for each facet of social media represent The Booth. The Booth may not require daily involvement but is important to developing a strategy that will increase ROI and accomplish communication goals rather than just being present without any real objective.

3 Key Roles to Make Your Social Team Scalable

One of the continuous discussions and questions surfacing in the social media chatterbox is that of “who owns social media?” Is it marketing? Public relations (PR)? Customer service? Continue Reading…

 

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