Archives for posts with tag: Klout

1.  What is visible to the public, to employers, and to potential references? When managing your online identity be aware that whatever is visible on Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media site, must be appropriate for any current or future employer to see.  Just one inappropriate tweet, update, or pinned photo can cause repercussions for your long-term career.  On Facebook you can click “View As” on your main profile page under the “Settings” drop down.

2.  Depending on what your position is, is it may be important to have a presence on certain sites? For seeking communications positions, it is important to show that you are knowledgeable about current social media trends.  Staying up-to-date with online sites can show your ability to manage change.  While it may not be necessary for you to be on Facebook and Twitter and Tumblr and Pinterest, having your presence certainly has its benefits.  LinkedIn is especially useful to recruiters.

3.  What is your online reputation?  Do you have a positive, negative, or neutral presence online? Your online reputation can range from positive to negative and inappropriate.  Be aware of how you come across on the internet.  While having a negative online reputation will certainly work against you, having a neutral presence won’t help you either.  In creating an online identity, be cognizant of how you want to come across to coworkers, future employers, and people you haven’t even met.  Social media allows us to create our own marketable versions of ourselves, take advantage of that.  Create a Google Alert for your name to track what is being said about you online.

4.  How do people interact with you and how do you interact with people online? The people that you interact with on social media sites reflect who you are.  How often you interact with people on these sites also speaks to what kind of person you are.  Social media sites, especially Facebook, but to a lesser extent Twitter, can paint a picture of you as an extrovert, introvert, or somewhere in between.  These sites might pigeonhole you as a social butterfly, or as a shut-in.  If you allow your content to be displayed, make sure that your interactions, and how often you interact, will benefit your image.  Klout is a good way to see an overview of how you interact with others online.

5.  What do you show interest in online? Don’t “like” anything detrimental to your image, and make sure to showcase what makes you unique.  What pages you like on Facebook, whom you follow on Twitter, and what you tweet about all reflect who you are and what your interests are.  Don’t showcase an aspect of yourself that you don’t want other people to know about, but also show what makes you unique.  Facebook privacy settings allow you to block content from some and not others by the creation of lists.

These are the  growing social media tools that will undoubtedly be indispensable in the upcoming year.

  • Content marketing, which has had some power as a social media tool in the past, will in the upcoming year become extremely influential, due, in part, to the now widespread knowledge of how to optimize SEO and how to manage customer relationships.  We’ve reached a period where marketers must have a variety of skills, from using online resources, to knowing how to edit a video.
  • In addition to having a variety of skills, marketers must also now be able to integrate marketing, technology, and data.  This is what Marketing Technologists and Marketing Scientists have specialized in.  The focus on this integration is going to be even more important in the upcoming year and is why marketers need to have knowledge of the entire spectrum of social media.
  • With Facebook, Linked In, and Reddit leading social media, it is vital not just to have a page, but to constantly update it and gain more influence.  Knowing the influence of your social media is a necessity for having an effective social media site.  Sites like Klout and PeerIndex, which put a number to your influence on social media, are incredibly helpful in figuring out what exactly your influence is and how you can improve it.
  • Social Media, with its inherent translucence, has created some potential problems with privacy and security–on both the individual and organizational level.  That is why, the last tool we’re thankful for is social media security.

For more on these growing tools and more, read this.

The PRSA panel about “Facebook’s Impact on Entertainment, PR, and Marketing” was an insightful look into a tool that over 750 million people use, many of them everyday.  This panel was led by Allyson Smith, VP, New Media at The Jim Henson Company; Clinton Schaff, VP, Dialogue Digital and Interactive Media Group and Golin Harris; Rich DeMuro, Tech Reporter at KTLA and Tribune; Eric Kuhn, Social Media Agent at United Talent Agency, and Kay Madati, Entertainment Strategist of Global Customer Marketing of Facebook.  Even though Facebook is not the newest social media tool, it is still proving indispensible and continues to penetrate deeper into user’s daily lives.  While all the panelists did concede that Facebook can in fact be a black hole of productivity on a personal level, they placed a greater importance on the benefits that Facebook can provide on a business level, and further on a social level.

There is a distinct difference between using Twitter and Facebook for business, and each panelist advised people not to combine their Facebook and Twitter accounts because the two sites have very different purposes.  Facebook provides a more natural forum for building a personal, thoughtful relationship; whereas Twitter provides a much faster and more concise diffusion of information—it’s great as newsfeed but for interacting with others Facebook is still king.  That is not to say that Twitter doesn’t lend itself to a dialogue, Twitter is great at getting the conversation started with people with like interests, Facebook is useful for keeping it going.

The event also highlighted how popularity and influence, which can be measured by Klout, on Facebook translates to popularity and influence in the real world.  But you shouldn’t just view your Facebook as a way to gauge your influence, you should use Facebook to build your brand by engaging people.  For instance, having a certain number of Facebook likes on its own is meaningless if this not equate to real world consumers or clients.  It is essential to be active on your Facebook and ensure that you will pop up the newsfeeds of those who liked your page.  Make sure to post engaging, pertinent status updates to build your fan base.  The panelists also discussed the importance of responding to negative posts that may be posted on your wall, for more on the importance of responding to criticism read our previous article here.

%d bloggers like this: