Archives for posts with tag: hong kong

This January we start our third year in business—in L.A. and Hong Kong!

We launched our Trufflepig Search division to help client companies find social media and digital communications, marketing and PR professionals below the executive level. We are proud to have served clients including GE, Gap and Coca-Cola/Japan out of our Hong Kong office, and AEG Live, AutoTrader.com, Forest Lawn and R&R Partners out of Los Angeles.

As the economy builds momentum in 2013, Trufflepig Search is here to help find your next great social media or digital communications team members.

We wish you a profitable new year, full of health, enjoyment, and digital happiness.

Trufflepig Search is pleased to report our success in Asia.  We opened as a division of Berkhemer Clayton, Inc. 18 months ago (Jan 2011) to help American corporations find communications and digital marketing executives in Asia.  Already we have handled senior-level communications searches for Gap Inc., GE, Coca-Cola Japan, and large public relations agencies in China. Our Managing Director in HK is Ms. Sai Pradhan, who previously worked here in LA for Berkhemer Clayton.  Our experience demonstrates that even service businesses like ours can export or expand into Asia. We consulted with Invest Hong Kong  to learn the legal and technical requirements of opening our business there.

Research recently published by Committee of 100–Chinese-American business leaders here in U.S. who do business in China—spotlights current opinions in both China and U.S. today.  The Committee of 100 researchers interviewed 4,000 people in China and U.S.—private citizens as well as business leaders. Findings showed that in both countries, there is a considerable gap between the views of general public versus the views of business people and political leaders. Looking at improving relationships between people in China and America, findings showed that increased understanding of language, culture and travel back and forth build trust.

Some of the observations:  People in China have favorable impressions of American culture and way of life, and see a cooperative relationship.  Chinese people are optimistic and confident about their own futures.  They now see themselves as a superpower.

Both groups value each other’s prominence in the world—they see need for cooperation to benefit global financial stability. But sometimes we don’t trust each other’s governments, Charlie Woo told Betsy Berkhemer-Credaire and Renee Fraser on their radio show UnfinishedBusiness.  Charlie owns MegaToys in Los Angeles  He is a C-100 leader, along with Chancellor Frank Wu, from UC Hastings College of Law in San Francisco, who said the Chinese cite problems in their own country with government corruption and an inadequate legal system. The U.S. participants cite a significant problem with Chinese copying American intellectual property. The research shows a trend for the first time that an increasing number of Chinese people see IP as a problem as well.

Charlie says China is soon going to be the world’s largest consumer economy—not just exporter of products, but consumer of goods, especially high-value big name American products.  That’s good news for companies expanding their business in China.  We are there to help.

Our very own Sai Pradhan, Managing Director of Trufflepig Search in Hong Kong was interviewed and featured in a story featuring Hong Kong’s ‘Digital Dreamers’–the digital and social media entrepreneurs making a deep impact in the Asia Pacific’s digital scene.

Sai is focused on recruitment of social media-savvy communications and marketing talent for client organizations.  Prior to her appointment to head the Hong Kong office, she was an Associate in the corporate communications and marketing speciality practice at Los Angeles-based Berkhemer Clayton, retained executive search consultants.  Previously with public relations agencies Ruder Finn and Fenton Communications, she has worked with a range of clients and industries, handling messaging, branding, positioning, corporate social responsibility, and media relations.

 Photo Credit: TimeOut.com.hk

A few highlights from Sai’s conversation with TimeOut Hong Kong:

How do you find your candidates?
If it’s a Hong Kong position, there are four or five names I can name off the top of my head, mainly because I’m so ingrained with the social media community here.

Describe the ideal candidate.
The ideal candidate in Asia is someone who can speak multiple languages, so if it’s a position in China it would be a bit silly to go with someone who only speaks English.The placements I’ve done have been 90 percent expat, but I don’t want to classify because it’s such a blurry line.


Is the salary which clients offer here on par with other cities in the world?
Of course, but you need to take into account that people don’t pay so much tax here, so base salaries are a little lower. In general, social media jobs tend to be a bit overpaid, that’s what I have been finding; just a little more than your average PR job.

Why is that?
I think perhaps people based in Asia feel less need to educate themselves on it than their counterparts elsewhere.

How educated do you need to be to succeed?
I’ve seen a lot of people just take it upon themselves to become the digital or socialmedia person within their company, but If you don’t understand whatever is applicable to your role, like brand messaging, then you’re going to be quite lost.


But isn’t it true that Hong Kong is far behind other world cities?

 


Complete Interview at TimeOut HK’s website

For more on Sai’s take on social media in China

This January marks our inaugural year in business, and we just wanted to say “thank you” as we wish you Happy New Year.

We launched our Trufflepig Search division to help client companies find social media and digital communications professionals below the executive level.  And we opened our office in Hong Kong–Trufflepig Search Ltd.– to serve client corporations in Asia.  Our clients include AutoTrader, GE, Gap, Huawei and Coca-Cola/Japan.

As the economy builds momentum in 2012, Trufflepig Search is here to help find your next great social media or digital communications team member in the United States or Asia.

We wish you a new year full of health, enjoyment, productivity and profitability.

Technology has been able to reduce work hours for some professions, but for all the PR, marketing and social media professionals we place, hours have increased as file sharing systems and a profusion of smartphones make it all too possible to work from home at all hours. Employees in Hong Kong work 48.4 hours on average per week, 21% more than the International Labour Organization recommends. In a world where it is commonplace for people to work such hours, what should employers do to ensure that employees maintain some semblance of work-life balance but stay productive?

Bess Hepworth runs Bonzapie, a coaching and performance consultancy in Hong Kong, and in a recent presentation for Women’s Media Network, she shared her insights on how to make work environments more fun, which in turn increases productivity and keeps employees creative and happy. We aren’t talking about run of the mill leadership seminars here where employees are being assessed for potential, but simple activities that get everyone up and moving, and create interactive opportunities between people who are otherwise chained to their desks and cubicles.  Incorporating a little fun into the routine can have a big difference on attitudes, moods, and as a result, happiness and stress levels.

Slideshow presentation here.

by Sai Pradhan, Managing Director, Trufflepig Search Limited, Hong Kong

Trufflepig Search Limited is part of a group of engaged social media practitioners in Hong Kong called HK Social. This month, Jay Oatway, “the most followed man on Twitter in Hong Kong” hosted HK Social’s monthly gathering, and shared his thoughts on the future of social networking using Color, a new photo sharing app, as an example.

Color is fascinating. It capitalizes on the urge we all have to see everything that’s around us, not just from our own angle, but from the other side of the room, providing a visual map of our surroundings.

Here’s how it works:

You post a photo or video publicly when you’re logged in, and your content is streamed to everyone else within 100 feet of your location. You don’t choose your network; this app does it for you. As a result, what you have is a series of images from various perspectives, all of the same location you are in yourself.

Click here to see a demo.

Jay uses the example of the International World Rugby Sevens, a tremendously popular annual event in Hong Kong which took place last month. While quite a few of us in the stands shared photos and comments via Twitter at this notoriously vibrant sporting event, how much more visual information might we have had if several people were using the Color app?

“It’s hard to pinpoint the best use case for this app because it is so unique in design. You can use it to share photos among a group without having to pass the phone around, or you can use it to keep a visual log of not only your life, but of the lives of those you see the most,” writes Ben Parr for Mashable.

It remains to be seen how well this app does in comparison to the slew of new photo and video sharing apps on the market, but we’re looking forward to discovering its many uses.

From Sai Pradhan, Managing Director of Trufflepig Search Limited Hong Kong:

Ripa Rashid, Executive Vice President of the Center of Work-Life Policy was in Hong Kong last week, speaking at a luncheon organized by Asia Society.

I was pleased to see a presentation dedicated to talent retention in China and India and women in the workplace within Asia Society’s March repertoire. Ripa Rashid of the Center of Work-Life Policy recently co-authored an article for Harvard Business Review, ‘The Battle for Female Power in China and India,’ in context of multinational corporations looking to China and India for growth, and within those geographies, female talent, as an important factor. At Asia Society’s luncheon at the Foreign Correspondents Club, Ripa shared some of her key themes and findings from her research. Here are the highlights:

  • The percentage of women at tertiary education levels has increased 10% in the last decade in India and 23% in China. This is evidence of the increasingly highly qualified female talent pool in both countries.
  • 85% of women in India and 83% of women in China are eager to be promoted to the next level, compared to 52% in the U.S. With ambition levels at such a high, women seem poised for professional advancement.
  • Women are reported to show high levels of loyalty to their employers in both countries: 92% in India and 88% in China. I wondered if this meant their pay scales didn’t jump as much as they might. I asked Ripa after the luncheon, and she said that generally speaking, women had different consideration factors than their male counterparts in finding and staying with favourable employers. Factors such as the quality of their teams, their comfort level with company policies, and the fact that the longer they stayed with their employers, the more likely they were to avail of flexible schedules, outweighed the desire for salary bumps.
  • In contextualizing the female talent pool in China and India, Ripa described the various ‘pulls’ on women in these countries. 35% of Chinese women and 52% of Indian women face pressure to drop out after they have their first child. ‘Daughterly guilt’ weighs 88% of women down in China and 70% of women in India, while maternal guilt affects 86% and 62% respectively.
  • She then went on to describe some of the ‘push’ factors. Jobs are becoming more extreme, with longer hours for women in China and India. On average, Ripa shared, they are working between 10-18 additional hours per week compared to their workload three years ago. An astounding statistic indeed.  Prejudice in the workplace affects 55% of women in India (enough for them to consider quitting or pulling back from their jobs) and 48% of women in China. Safety, and practical and cultural barriers to international mobility (considered an important part of professional advancement), are other factors that ‘push’ women in these countries.
  • China’s one-child policy means that it will soon be faced with a graying population, whereas in India, the demographics weigh favourably toward the young but are faced with infrastructural challenges in the country.

Ripa shared a few models that some companies have employed to attract and sustain the best female talent, and help women deal with the various pulls and pushes of the work environment, such as Google India’s Women’s Engineering Award, Intel’s Women at Intel in China, and Cisco’s Extended Flex Program.

By Sai Pradhan, Managing Director HK, Trufflepig Search Limited

In August 2010, Ogilvy PR’s 360 Degree Digital Influence Practice’s Social Media team in China put together an infographic to show China’s social media equivalents in an expansive list of categories: wikis, deal-of-the-day, instant messaging, blogging, and SNS to name a few. While the equivalents may have different features, they take on enough similarities to be comparable in terms of user demographics and usage. The most basic example is China’s Ren Ren which is a Facebook equivalent.

On March 2, 360 Degree Digital Influence released an updated version which showcases just how much change has taken place in the short six-month period. The new infographic gives a quick snapshot of the increase in platforms. Groupon’s commitment to China is reflected, as are Quora (compare to Yahoo Answers) and Tencent’s (Internet service portal) micro-blogging services.

“Making graphics like this is, of course, far from an exact science,” writes Thomas Crampton, Asia Pacific Director of 360 Digital Influence. We agree, Thomas, but it’s a great, easily digestible visual regardless.

Read the full article here: China Social Media Evolution

By Sai Pradhan, Managing Director, Trufflepig Search Limited, Hong Kong

Burson-Marsteller has predicted 11 trends in the digital communications realm in China for 2011. “If 2009 and 2010 was a period of ‘digital foreplay’ for companies at large, then 2011 and 2012 are pegged to be the year of ‘digital embrace,’” said Zaheer Nooruddin, director and lead digital strategist at Burson-Marsteller China in a recent article in Campaign Asia.

Burson’s predictions hit the nail on the head. Trufflepig Search in Hong Kong is witnessing the digital re-think in China as companies seek sound, integrated social media strategies versus the usually scattered tactical approaches everyone took to in previous years simply to be on the bandwagon. ROI is more important now than ever, as better services become available. More senior-level executives are taking to Twitter and Sina Weibo (China’s Twitter equivalent) as the need to engage and promote transparency becomes more apparent. Other predictions include the rise of the use of infographics to convey data, marketing based on the use of location-based communications, increased group buying activity, and the recognition of the value of the mobile web market in China.

Hand in hand with China’s predicted ‘digital embrace’ as Nooruddin cleverly calls it, is the increasing demand for excellent social media fluent professionals.

BM’s Digital communications Trends for China in 2011

There has never been a more exciting time to be in public relations, advertising and marketing, thanks to the revolutionizing momentum of social media, online communications and creativity.  The sheer adventure of being at the beginning of a new frontier, a global transformation, a whole new way of looking at communication, it’s exhilarating.

Also it’s confusing, and corporations are wondering—who’s who and where’s where in this new world.  Who really knows what they are doing?  And are most corporate communications departments fumbling as they learn?  Can anyone afford to make mistakes as they learn?

On this threshold comes a new company, called Trufflepig Search, to recruit experienced communications and marketing professionals who are fluent in social media and savvy about how to harness the beast to drive the brand.   Trufflepig Search—we dig deep to unearth the best in social media.  Like the prized animal that can sense where the most delicious mushrooms grow and dig them up unharmed for consumption by people who appreciate the best, we at Trufflepig Search know how to find the best communicators and separate them from the rest.  We bring them to client corporations for consumption as full-time leaders and coaches—the key to corporate social media strategy that works.

With offices in Los Angeles and Hong Kong, Trufflepig Search will launch in January 2011, to serve the hungry consumer brand companies who desperately need strategic communicators who can navigate and capture social media for their brands.   Launched as a separate division of respected executive search firm Berkhemer Clayton, Trufflepig Search will capture the category.  Our goal is that inside three months, corporate communications executives will think Trufflepig when they need one or a team of social media pro’s.

The team-members we place will transform your company for the digital age.

“We dig deep to recruit the best in social media,” let us know what you think of this tagline on our Facebook page, Twitter, or join our LinkedIn group; comments, follows, and likes welcome. And look forward to our website launch in January 2011!

 

 

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