Managing a Facebook Career Page is another way to broaden a company’s social engagement.  It may seem a bit superfluous to have a Facebook Career Page in addition to a company website or company LinkedIn profile, but having a career page on Facebook immediately opens up a business to the 901 million Facebook users.

By curating your Facebook Career Page yourself, instead of letting Facebook automatically create one, you are taking control of your brand, much the same way as creating a page for your business gives you control over the content.  Managing your company’s page yourself is the only way that you can control how your brand is marketed.

Having a career page provides an outlet for you to create a dialogue with your consumer base.  Marketing through social media is all about creating a community of followers and interacting with your followers can strengthen your brand, SEO, and customer base.  Some tips for engaging your followers on Facebook include: sharing links instead of only text and give your followers reason to spread the word of your brand through promotions, useful original content, and thoughtful leadership.  Include phrases such as “share with your friends” and “click here” to create an interactive relationship with your followers.  Direct them to your other web presences to add value and track the user engagement.

Having a Facebook Career Page can be time consuming, but it can also be an asset to help build your brand.  LIke any medium, make sure this also fits with your overall brand strategy before you just hit “Go”.

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Facebook’s underwhelming stock performance and the recent flight of some of their top executives has prompted people to hypothesize how the company will appease its investors.  Facebook needs to create more of demand for its stock; it has been rumored that Facebook may cease to be a free service, but in light of its disappointing IPO this may be the best way to boost revenues. Of course, they will have to have some free services to keep their user base, but they could benefit from some paid features.

Facebook just unveiled a new feature where companies can pay to promote posts and status updates.  Having to pay to promote posts on Facebook is not by itself a terrible feature, but it does go against the open access that made these social networks so successful in the first place.  While many social media tools, such as LinkedIn, do have options that require fees, the potential problem with this paid promotions feature is that it could diminish their user base.

It’s too soon to tell if having paid accounts would destroy Facebook. While having to pay for an account would undoubtedly unrage users, Facebook is so popular and so often used that people may just pay the fee instead of taking the hassle to switch over to a rival site, such as Google+.

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Trufflepig Search is pleased to report our success in Asia.  We opened as a division of Berkhemer Clayton, Inc. 18 months ago (Jan 2011) to help American corporations find communications and digital marketing executives in Asia.  Already we have handled senior-level communications searches for Gap Inc., GE, Coca-Cola Japan, and large public relations agencies in China. Our Managing Director in HK is Ms. Sai Pradhan, who previously worked here in LA for Berkhemer Clayton.  Our experience demonstrates that even service businesses like ours can export or expand into Asia. We consulted with Invest Hong Kong  to learn the legal and technical requirements of opening our business there.

Research recently published by Committee of 100–Chinese-American business leaders here in U.S. who do business in China—spotlights current opinions in both China and U.S. today.  The Committee of 100 researchers interviewed 4,000 people in China and U.S.—private citizens as well as business leaders. Findings showed that in both countries, there is a considerable gap between the views of general public versus the views of business people and political leaders. Looking at improving relationships between people in China and America, findings showed that increased understanding of language, culture and travel back and forth build trust.

Some of the observations:  People in China have favorable impressions of American culture and way of life, and see a cooperative relationship.  Chinese people are optimistic and confident about their own futures.  They now see themselves as a superpower.

Both groups value each other’s prominence in the world—they see need for cooperation to benefit global financial stability. But sometimes we don’t trust each other’s governments, Charlie Woo told Betsy Berkhemer-Credaire and Renee Fraser on their radio show UnfinishedBusiness.  Charlie owns MegaToys in Los Angeles  He is a C-100 leader, along with Chancellor Frank Wu, from UC Hastings College of Law in San Francisco, who said the Chinese cite problems in their own country with government corruption and an inadequate legal system. The U.S. participants cite a significant problem with Chinese copying American intellectual property. The research shows a trend for the first time that an increasing number of Chinese people see IP as a problem as well.

Charlie says China is soon going to be the world’s largest consumer economy—not just exporter of products, but consumer of goods, especially high-value big name American products.  That’s good news for companies expanding their business in China.  We are there to help.

Sai Pradhan, Managing Director, Trufflepig Search Hong Kong, was featured on the keynote panel at the Women Media Networks last month.  The two others who spoke at the panel were Jocelyn Liipfert, Head of Social Media at TBWA, and Jay Oatway, digital consultant and author of Mastering Story, Community and Influence: How to Use Social Media to Become a Social Leader.  Jocelyn, Jay, and Sai together stage the popular #HKSocial–a networking event focused on the power of digital and social media.

Sai explains how LinkedIn helps recruiters:

“In my experience as a headhunter for PR and communications positions, we do use LinkedIn, but very selectively. It’s a research tool, but we develop candidates more by personally reaching out to existing contacts and to sources in our networks and by developing specific research to find top talent for the position we are handling. So, yes, while professionals who are keeping an eye out for new opportunities should certainly create and use LinkedIn profiles, it cannot be the only way, nor should it consume all your job seeking time. But if you are on LinkedIn do make it easy for a recruiter to contact you.”
For more of Sai’s discussion on the WMN panel.

When Google+ was released a little over a year ago, it was marketed as a competitor to Facebook.  While Google+ has failed to reach the level of popularity and profitability of Facebook, it has not failed as a site.  The potential of Google+ is in its being an extension of Google, not in its attempt to be a social networking site.

Insiders view Google+ as a tool for supporting already-established internet tools, such as Google and Youtube.  This month Google+ introduced more features designed to integrate different Google tools into its interface. The Events feature on Google+ will be compatible with Google calendar and allows you to invite people who are outside your circles.  Google+ connects the different Google tools, such as mail, google search, and now the calendar, into one organized site.

From our view, people don’t engage with companies on Google+ as much as they do on Facebook, which makes it less successful as a marketing tool.  From the recruiting standpoint, the vast majority of users aren’t active enough on the site to make Google+ as worthwhile as LinkedIn, or even Facebook, for this purpose.

Google+ does beat Facebook at video-chatting.  The Google+ video-chatting feature allows users to form “hangouts” with many users on site.  Organizations, such as news organizations, can use such hangouts to live-stream interviews and take questions from a virtual and interactive audience.  

Finally, the mobile site for Google+ is more accessible.  As mobile is becoming an increasingly important market for social media, the Google+’ user-friendly mobile app gives it a possible advantage against Facebook.

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Google’s creative new documentary, Project Re:Brief, takes four classic advertisements from Coca-Cola, Volvo, Alka-Seltzer, and Avis and re-imagines their message with the help of digital advertising. The new campaigns creatively combine the classic message of the original ads with today’s demands for interactive marketing.

The main challenge associated with the project was keeping the message the same as the original ads.  The goal was to update the ads to the current market while remaining true to their original intent–to what made the ads iconic.  Unlike one-way print or commercial advertising, digital advertising is meant to engage people–what better way to engage than by adding interactive elements to proven campaigns.  All four digital advertisements focused on creating an interactive and innovative experience, but Avis and Volvo’s ads are worth noting.

The Avis ad featured in the project originally featured their “We try harder” slogan.  The advertisers created an interactive marketing campaign where users’ stories are turned into short animated video clips.  Avis also encourages users to send in negative feedback so that they can improve as a company and live up to their slogan.

Volvo’s new digital ad drew inspiration from the powerful 1962 ad, “Drive it like you hate it”, which cleverly showcased the durability and longevity of Volvo.  Keeping this message in mind, advertisers created a new digital ad campaign in which anyone can track the progress of Irv Gordon, a man who has driven the same Volvo since 1966 as he approaches the 3-million-mile mark with his car.  Users can track his journey on Google Maps and even create their own road-trip adventures.  These campaigns show how digital has truly revolutionized the consumer experience.

Re:Brief communicates the idea that for a campaign to stand out in today’s social media-obsessed atmosphere, it must be engaging, interactive, and above all, have a timeless and relatable message.

Imagine being able to see all of the sites you frequent online collected in one organized forum.  Instead of having to visit Facebook, Twitter, and the other sites you visit separately, you could instead visit one site.  This is exactly what Flavors.me is attempting to accomplish by collecting all of your social media needs and displaying what is most important.  Flavors.me’s goal is to eliminate the oversharing created by all the superfluous information on social media sites.

In order to eliminate oversharing, Flavors showcases important information from the social media sites that you use most frequently from over 30 social media sites that you can choose from to add to your Flavors account.  The problem with Flavors is that not all of the social media sites work seamlessly on the site yet.  While Etsy and Hype Machine work well on Flavors.me because music and photos are integration right into the stream, Netflix and Facebook seem awkward.  It will be interesting to see how they are able to successfully integrate Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn in one place in the coming months.

Just as you can have followers, and can follow other people, on Facebook, Twitter, and many other social media sites, you can do the same on Flavors.  It compiles all of your needs into one site and allows people to interact with different components of your social media site that were previously completely separate.  It’s Flavors’ interface that really stands the chance of setting it apart from other social media aggregate sites, but without a more seamless integration of the most popular sites.

What exactly is the future of Flavors.me?  While conceptually a site that would combine the most important aspects of your social media tools would be extremely beneficial, Flavors is not exactly user friendly–something that is pretty much a necessity for a social media site to gain popularity  With 750,000 users it might be difficult for Flavors to compete with Facebook’s extensive, loyal network–but perhaps it will become an add-on to Facebook, only time will tell.

For more of Flavors.me:

http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/11/28/flavors-me-spins-into-a-social-network/

http://www.digitaltrends.com/social-media/flavors-me-evolves-from-personal-landing-page-and-shows-off-its-social-aspirations/

http://vator.tv/news/2011-11-29-flavors-offers-a-centralized-and-confusing-social-hub

Jobsandtalent is an up and coming European-based recruiting site that incorporates social networking into the hiring process.  Felipe Navio Garcia and Juan Urdiales founded this startup on the hopes of using Facebook’s social network to change how companies search for employees.  Jobsandtalent works by getting information from a user’s Facebook profile information, such as education, work experience, and friends, but not any status updates or photos. Garcia and Urdiales both were separately developing a social recruiting site after realizing how social connections often help people find jobs through their friends.  Garcia and Urdiales had been connected to each other by mutual friends who realized they were both interested in developing similar businesses–that’s how they became partners.

One surprising aspect of Jobsandtalent is the use of Facebook, not LinkedIn as the source for their social recruitment site.  LinkedIn is a social media tool for professionals; it is designed for networking and hiring, whereas Facebook is a social media tool for friendships.  Garcia and Urdiales chose to connect their networking site to Facebook, because they believe one’s personal–not professional–connections most often lead to jobs.  Garcia explains that “The best 20 or 30 people you can ask for a recommendation are on Facebook, not LinkedIn”.  Jobsandtalent is the European alternative to BranchOut, another popular Facebook hiring site.  So far, Jobsandtalent has not widely been used outside of Europe.  On Jobsandtalent you have to add friends to your Jobsandtalent profile to get job suggestions, but on Branchout you do not.  While Branchout is also more user friendly and is the more established of the two, Jobsandtalent is gaining popularity in Europe.

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1.  What is visible to the public, to employers, and to potential references? When managing your online identity be aware that whatever is visible on Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media site, must be appropriate for any current or future employer to see.  Just one inappropriate tweet, update, or pinned photo can cause repercussions for your long-term career.  On Facebook you can click “View As” on your main profile page under the “Settings” drop down.

2.  Depending on what your position is, is it may be important to have a presence on certain sites? For seeking communications positions, it is important to show that you are knowledgeable about current social media trends.  Staying up-to-date with online sites can show your ability to manage change.  While it may not be necessary for you to be on Facebook and Twitter and Tumblr and Pinterest, having your presence certainly has its benefits.  LinkedIn is especially useful to recruiters.

3.  What is your online reputation?  Do you have a positive, negative, or neutral presence online? Your online reputation can range from positive to negative and inappropriate.  Be aware of how you come across on the internet.  While having a negative online reputation will certainly work against you, having a neutral presence won’t help you either.  In creating an online identity, be cognizant of how you want to come across to coworkers, future employers, and people you haven’t even met.  Social media allows us to create our own marketable versions of ourselves, take advantage of that.  Create a Google Alert for your name to track what is being said about you online.

4.  How do people interact with you and how do you interact with people online? The people that you interact with on social media sites reflect who you are.  How often you interact with people on these sites also speaks to what kind of person you are.  Social media sites, especially Facebook, but to a lesser extent Twitter, can paint a picture of you as an extrovert, introvert, or somewhere in between.  These sites might pigeonhole you as a social butterfly, or as a shut-in.  If you allow your content to be displayed, make sure that your interactions, and how often you interact, will benefit your image.  Klout is a good way to see an overview of how you interact with others online.

5.  What do you show interest in online? Don’t “like” anything detrimental to your image, and make sure to showcase what makes you unique.  What pages you like on Facebook, whom you follow on Twitter, and what you tweet about all reflect who you are and what your interests are.  Don’t showcase an aspect of yourself that you don’t want other people to know about, but also show what makes you unique.  Facebook privacy settings allow you to block content from some and not others by the creation of lists.

Facebook published new stats in an amendment to its S1 documents.  These new stats depict Facebook’s growth and revenue up until March 31st.  The new stats demonstrate once again how profitable and popular Facebook is.

In just one year, Facebook has managed to increase the number of monthly users from 680 million to 901 million.  The number of daily users has also increased from 372 million to 526 million.  About 125 billion friendships are documented on Facebook every single day.  These stats show what a staggering impact Facebook has on our lives.  Even the number of monthly mobile users is remarkable, totalling at 488 million users.

Regarding profit, Facebook’s revenue increased from $731 billion last year to $1.058 billion.  However, the net income of this quarter did decrease from last year’s quarter.  If Facebook’s purchase of Instagram does not pan out then Facebook will have to pay $200 million.  The deal is itself worth $1,010,470,000.  As Facebook users already share 300 million photos every day on Facebook, it made sense for Zuckerberg to buy Instagram.  Facebook’s purchase of Instagram will allow it to further its presence in photo sharing.  Whether or not this billion dollar purchase of Instagram will pay off, only time will tell.  Critics of the purchase claim that Instagram may prove to be a passing trend that will quickly become outdated.  Other criticism is that Instagram will not have any positive effect on Facebook’s number of users or profit.

 

For more on the S-1 Amendment

For more on Facebook’s purchase of Instagram

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